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Found 2 results

  1. Steve S

    Tub Gurnards

    A pair of good sized Tub Gurnards (Trigla lucerna), the largest of the Gurnards species round the UK coast. Note the body colour variations even when caught from the same location. Tub's feature very large blue fringed pectorals extending past the vent, the blue fringe can be clearly seen by the specimen on the right and rather less so by the specimen on the left. The back ranges from a pink to full red shading down to a white belly occasionally carrying a pinky orange tint. Tub's have the more rounded or blunt dorsal fin of the three main species. Size: Up to 12lb, the ones pictured are around 4lb.

    © Steve Scott

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